About KIK

There are over two million orphans in Uganda and over 50% of Uganda’s population is under the age of 15. Many countries, including Uganda, in Africa have been ravaged and torn apart by AIDS and war leaving millions of innocent children on the streets and without a family. Many of these children find their way to the inner city and join a gang inside a ghetto just to survive. The streets are littered with abandoned and/or orphaned children. Many die from malnutrition and starvation. Others die from diseases such as malaria and typhoid. Their numbers are too great and yet they are an unnumbered population. They have become to their society, disposable. However, there are those who refuse to accept these facts as the only answer. Kids Inspiring Kids plans on “Inspiring Nations One Life at a Time”.

Vision:

Kids Inspiring Kids is a non-profit 501(c) 3 Corporation in the USA. The Parent Organization is The International Fellowship of Ministries. Kids Inspiring Kids can issue tax deductible receipts for any money or goods received.

Friday, March 17, 2017

How Many People Does it Take To Dig a Well?!





Kids Inspiring Kids currently has two American volunteers in Uganda, Africa helping to dig wells on Place of Refuge Village land. These wells are the foundation for everything else to come. Water is life. 








The volunteers were greeted in the Banda Acholi Quarters with a celebration of local singing and dancing. They even got to participate with local drums and instruments. 



In Uganda, we have only two seasons since we are located on the equator, dry and rainy season. During rainy season the roads are treacherous and mud slides are common, but in dry season everyone hopes that they have enough reserve water saved to last until the next rainy season. The city water is run by the government and sometimes it turns off, for no rhyme or reason.






The first well had to be dug 30 feet down, which is about 10 feet deeper than originally planned, but it has about a 15-foot pocket. 
The adventure to dig this well was not without its hardships. These water wells will be used to make bricks, laundry, cooking, etc.


The car broke down getting out to the land, the casing on the well broke...TIA (this is Africa). When something goes wrong and/or breaks, unfortunately, there is not a Home Depot down the road to keep the work moving at a smooth pace. The work is also incredibly labor intensive and with the heat and humidity, it only adds to the challenges. All of the hard work is worth it though.


There is a lot of work still to be done. We need your help. Visit the Meeting Needs link on our website for current and immediate needs.
Contact our PR Manager Nicole with any additional questions: nicole@kidsinspire.com
Visit our Facebook Page for more photos, videos, live streams and information. 



How to Donate
1. You can use our link on this page to donate through PayPal with your choice of funding. This can be as a one-time donation or a recurring payment. Please be aware that this method does result in a 3% surcharge to our organization. Click: DONATE
2. You can mail a check directly to “Kids Inspiring Kids” at 3601 Fowler Drive, Austin, Texas 78738. Please specify “Village Project” in a note or on the check so that we can appropriately direct your funds.
3. You can provide a check to one of our volunteer fundraisers to be deposited directly into the Kids Inspiring Kids account. Contact Nicole at nicole@kidsinspire.com

Monday, March 6, 2017

The Story of Ketty Adong

The story you are about to read truly represent the experiences that nearly all of these
survivors have endured. They have been through more in their short lives than any of us
can imagine. Yet, they somehow find incredible strength and hope.
This story is entirely factual and is written unedited in the voice of
the survivor. Please be aware that these are emotionally sensitive and graphic depictions
of struggles.

I was 19 years old and I just had a baby with my husband. I went to the village to see
my family in Lira when the rebels came and took my brother, my sister and me. They
tied us all together with ropes as they started marching to where we didn’t know. It
was raining hard and the going was not easy. One of the boys that were with us was
commanded to go into a shop and bring out items for the rebels. He refused and was
shot to death. The rebels used fear tactics and threats of death to keep us marching
and to stay with them. We finally reached a place called Orumu where the rebels put
us into groups to do certain jobs. I was given the job of cooking for the bosses. They
demanded I cook for them even when food was not available. If there were any
complaints then we were beaten and threatened with death. As we moved many people
died and I lost hope for living. From Orumu we traveled to Karamoja district. It was
here that they told us drink milk mixed with blood. When I refused I knew that it
was the end of me but I was able to pretend that I drank it and was spared. One day
an airplane flew overhead and started bombing where we were. Many were wounded
and several died. We fled and crossed the Moroto River. Life was getting harder with
nothing to eat and only dirty water to drink. We continued to march to the border of
Sudan. The rebel group went back down into Uganda and continued to kill people.
They cut mouths and ears off of people just because. People in the group became sicker and weaker. When they could no longer move the rebels asked them if they wanted to rest. If their answer was yes then they were shot and given a “permanent rest”. We reached Gulu and we had to look for food. They ambushed people taking food to sell at the market. Many people were killed and others captured. There was a pregnant woman that was captured and when the rebels found out they put her to death immediately. The rebels only like you to be pregnant by them. I got pregnant by one of the rebels and I was very sick. There was not enough food to sustain me and
my legs were not working properly. I was left, because I couldn’t walk, which was a
miracle that I wasn’t killed. I waited for four days when some people found me and
took me to a place where I could rest. I buried my clothes as I didn’t want to
remember the time in the bush. I gave birth to a baby boy who eventually died. I
made my way to Kampala to stay with a sister and her husband. At first, they didn’t
believe that it was really me and that I was alive. I was taken to a hospital. I was told
I have TB. I ended up in the Banda Acholi Quarters and have been working towards
a life outside of the Bush. I have two children and am trying to help three others that
belonged to my sister who died. One of my biggest problems is that I cannot go back
to my village as people there think I am the one who caused the death of the boy who
refused to get things out of the shop for the rebels. All I want now is a place to go
where I have enough food, shelter and to make a better life for me and my children.


You can be a part of helping Ketty and her family find a better life. We are building Place of Refuge Village. Learn more by clicking this link. 

How to Donate
1. You can use our link on this page to donate through PayPal with your choice of funding. This can be as a one-time donation or a recurring payment. Please be aware that this method does result in a 3% surcharge to our organization. Click: DONATE
2. You can mail a check directly to “Kids Inspiring Kids” at 3601 Fowler Drive, Austin, Texas 78738. Please specify “Village Project” in a note or on the check so that we can appropriately direct your funds.
3. You can provide a check to one of our volunteer fundraisers to be deposited directly into the Kids Inspiring Kids account. 


Contact our PR manager Nicole: nicole@kidsinspire.com for more information